Trail widths - Page 9 - ATVConnection.com ATV Enthusiast Community

Land, Trail and Environmental Issues Discuss political and social events effecting where we ride. Do not enter here unless you are willing to disagree with the statements made. What happens in this forum and Sub-Forums stays in these forums.

Trail widths

Reply

  #81  
Old 07-10-2018, 01:36 PM
Extreme Pro Rider
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Illinois
Posts: 3,013
Default

In the end even if you can somehow find a way around trail width markers, at some point on the trail, your wide machine isn't going to fit. Its dumb to think that you can still make it.
 
Reply With Quote
  #82  
Old 07-10-2018, 02:32 PM
Specta's Avatar
Pro Rider
Loves riding and can't get enough.
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 3,837
Default


The width of the trail is not always an issue here - its "where" the trail is.

Most of them go thru "roadless" area's of the forest where you can't have a road but you can have a trail and trails are 50" wide or less.

Here's another new barrier and just how well they are installed.
 
Reply With Quote
  #83  
Old 07-10-2018, 05:50 PM
MooseHenden's Avatar
Super Moderator
Well, golly JimBob!
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 36,158
Default

Nicely done.
 
Reply With Quote
  #84  
Old 07-10-2018, 07:28 PM
Dragginbutt's Avatar
Pro Rider
Is old enough to know better, but too young to stop.
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Northern Virginia, near DC
Posts: 2,677
Default

Yeah I guess it all comes down to where you live. Out East, the Hatfield McCoy trails were limited for a few years, but as the machines grew in size, they were losing revenue with restrictions, and just opened it up to all. Like the Paiute trail system, they have some restricted trails... along with single track etc. But around there, the trails are their lifeblood now, so you are not going to see them shoot themselves in the foot.
 
Reply With Quote
  #85  
Old 07-10-2018, 07:37 PM
Specta's Avatar
Pro Rider
Loves riding and can't get enough.
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 3,837
Default

Aren't the Hatfield McCoy trails private property??
 
Reply With Quote
  #86  
Old 07-10-2018, 10:05 PM
Kymco 450i's Avatar
Pro Rider
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Perrysburg Ohio
Posts: 1,202
Default

Originally Posted by Specta View Post
Aren't the Hatfield McCoy trails private property??


Many do cross private land and some trails are public land, however all the trails are patrolled by the local HM police, and yes there are quite a few of them. They are constantly watching and those that cause a problem pay very hefty fines or have there machines taken away. This is why they get away with charging the fees that they do, however, if you have been there you will find the fees are well worth the quality of the trails and having the help you need if trouble arises. Most of the complaints are from those that abused the system and got caught. Like I stated before increase the fines to cover the cost of extra patrols, once the crooked people are broke or bankrupt, you wont need that many patrol people anymore!
No different than a city with a high crime rate, make the crooks pay for the extra police in larger fines and confiscating there stuff, once the crooks can no longer afford to be around, the crime rate falls and you wont need nearly as many police! It works, society just wont let it work as someone might get themselves caught and have to pay that stiff fine!
Just like redlight camera's....don't run any red lights or speed and the camera's will soon come down as it is to costly to keep them going without catching criminals. When we start making crime pay for the peoples protection, crime will drop, but as long as we make crime profitable for criminals, the good citizens will continue to pay foe little to no police protection
 
Reply With Quote
  #87  
Old 07-11-2018, 09:36 AM
Specta's Avatar
Pro Rider
Loves riding and can't get enough.
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 3,837
Default

Originally Posted by Dragginbutt View Post
Yeah I guess it all comes down to where you live. Out East, the Hatfield McCoy trails were limited for a few years, but as the machines grew in size, they were losing revenue with restrictions, and just opened it up to all. Like the Paiute trail system, they have some restricted trails... along with single track etc. But around there, the trails are their lifeblood now, so you are not going to see them shoot themselves in the foot.
The Paiute trail is the life blood for a lot of folks who live out here. It generates over $28,000,000.00 annually to the local economy.

80% of all roads/trails here are open to everything. Less than 18% have width restrictions.

Under the Clinton administration congress passes laws stating that where there are no existing roads were designated roadless areas and you can't build roads in those area's but you can build trails. We are still building 50" trails thru roadless areas across the state.

To open a section of trail up for the wider machines requires NEPA (The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is a United States environmental law that promotes the enhancement of the environment and established the President's Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ). The law was enacted on January 1, 1970.) studies and environmental impact studies that make it cost prohibitive to do.

Many of our restricted trails were never listed on the land management place because they are trails not roads so they exist in these roadless area's designated by congress.

We also enjoy them and so do a lot of other people. We believe that this will keep the Paiute Trail a diverse and unique trail system as others open up their trails systems to wider machines. Even the people here who have seasonal business's that solely make their living off the trail system don't want them opened up to bigger machines.

The majority of the damage done is by locals who feel they can do anything they want. Shed hunters and other hunters are the worst. They also leave behind the most trash.
 
Reply With Quote
  #88  
Old 07-11-2018, 09:52 AM
Specta's Avatar
Pro Rider
Loves riding and can't get enough.
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 3,837
Default

Originally Posted by Kymco 450i View Post
Many do cross private land and some trails are public land, however all the trails are patrolled by the local HM police, and yes there are quite a few of them. They are constantly watching and those that cause a problem pay very hefty fines or have there machines taken away. This is why they get away with charging the fees that they do, however, if you have been there you will find the fees are well worth the quality of the trails and having the help you need if trouble arises. Most of the complaints are from those that abused the system and got caught. Like I stated before increase the fines to cover the cost of extra patrols, once the crooked people are broke or bankrupt, you wont need that many patrol people anymore!
No different than a city with a high crime rate, make the crooks pay for the extra police in larger fines and confiscating there stuff, once the crooks can no longer afford to be around, the crime rate falls and you wont need nearly as many police! It works, society just wont let it work as someone might get themselves caught and have to pay that stiff fine!
Just like redlight camera's....don't run any red lights or speed and the camera's will soon come down as it is to costly to keep them going without catching criminals. When we start making crime pay for the peoples protection, crime will drop, but as long as we make crime profitable for criminals, the good citizens will continue to pay foe little to no police protection
I couldn't agree more.
 
Reply With Quote
  #89  
Old 07-11-2018, 06:28 PM
Dragginbutt's Avatar
Pro Rider
Is old enough to know better, but too young to stop.
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Northern Virginia, near DC
Posts: 2,677
Default

HM is for the most part built on private lands. They started on coal mining lands when the mines were shut down. The economy tanked and trail building was a state/private deal. The state assumed liability and negotiated the right of way, and local governments in the towns also passed a lot of laws to allow ATV/UTV/Dirt bikes to travel on the roads to and from lodging, gas stations and restaurants. It really has been a Godsend for the locals in WV. Virginia has also started their own trails to get in on the action as well since coal was a big part of their economy too. I guess the wider trails are not an issue since a good part of the trail systems are using the mine roads, logging roads etc. So they started out that way. No I have not been to the Paiute trail system, and further west. A decade ago, there were issues with State registration that kept me away. Same deal in Wisconsin. I live in a state where they do not register off road vehicles. When I tried to go to Wisconsin, because I had no registration to prove I had paid the state tax on my purchase, they wanted me to pay the state tax again in WI. Ah, no thank you. Although I own property there, but reside in Virginia, it didn't matter. I can rid on my acreage, but I am not going to make a 2000 mile round trip to limit myself to 9 acres. Anyway, wasn't bashing anybody or any place. The Paiute is a place I would like to ride some day, but I am doubtful I'll get out there with advanced age rolling in like MidWest thunder.
 
Reply With Quote
  #90  
Old 07-11-2018, 09:03 PM
Specta's Avatar
Pro Rider
Loves riding and can't get enough.
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 3,837
Default

I never thought for a second you were bashing - not at all Dragginbutt.

One of the original reasons for the Paiute Trail was to try and get people to come and ride "the loop" that went thru several small towns hoping people would drop some coin in each town and hopefully stimulate the economy a bit, that was 30 years ago. The loop is roughly 280 miles and goes thru several small towns.

The Paiute Trail goes thru 5 counties and 17 towns. They are all ATV friendly.
 
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Quick Reply: Trail widths


Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    Get answers from community experts
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: