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Old 02-09-2014, 05:06 PM
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Default 2002 Polaris Sportsman 500

Howdy folks. New member here from NH. I posted this in the introduction section, figured I would post in the Polaris section as well.

I joined up because I'm seriously considering buying a used Polaris Sportsman 500. I have been out of the 4wheeler scene since 2005. The machine I'm looking to buy is a 2002 (Polaris Sportsman 500 w/1200 miles on it). Traditionally I would not buy something this old. However, this machine is owned by an uncle of mine (original owner). Long story short (sort of) I am comfortable that the routine maintenance has been done as needed, and it has been ridden reasonably responsibly. He has not used the machine for almost 2 years. It has been started and warmed up a couple times a year over the last 2 years, no driving.

Now the bad (potentially). He had it into Polaris for maintenance over 2 years ago. Also, he was having a transmission/clutch issue being fixed. Basically, the 4wheeler never felt like it was disengaging when it sat at an idle. You had to hold the brake pretty firmly if you didn't want to roll. Also, when you went to take off slowly it felt kind of jumpy/grabby. When he got it back all was ok for about a week. It started doing the same thing all over again and he parked it. It is a shame, it is a nice machine that is in good shape for its age. I have the opportunity to get the machine and figure out what it needs before paying any $$.

I have three primary questions for all of you aficionados:

1: What would be a fair price for this machine as is? I searched it and it looks like it is worth about $1300 if it had no problems. I'm not expecting to pay much, but I want to be fair.

2: Are the issues that it has (described above) a prelude to major/ongoing/long term problems?

3: Are these machines (this particular year/model/generation) a good solid rig? Not looking to invest time & money if this is a troublesome/expensive machine to own.

Thanks for your input!!

The name is Jim BTW
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Old 02-09-2014, 06:31 PM
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Common problem on 2001 and 2002 models on creeping problems.I had more problems on these two year models than any other.This is mainly because the rear clutch gets out of alignment from the front clutch causing the belt to rub the inner front sheath keeping constant pressure on the rear clutch,making it hard to shift. Usually adding washers building out the rear clutch solves most of the problem. Most of the time I had to change belts as they were pretty glazed from the creeping and clutch slipping. Plus once you have the clutch cover off it's a good idea to blow out all the belt dust in an open area. Washer #2 behind the rear(driven) clutch is what I stocked up on.Dirt Cheap Yamaha, Honda, Arctic Cat & Polaris OEM Parts & Accessories – Cycle Parts Warehouse You can just slide the clutch off and match this washer at any hardware store. It's not that hard of a job.At times the front clutch fiber washer and brass washer in the one way bearing wear down allowing the belt to slide also.If this happens best to have a shop do it as the cost of the clutch puller and spider tool needed to separate the clutch would cost as much as the average shop charges to rebuild one. #2 and 18 on the washers.Dirt Cheap Yamaha, Honda, Arctic Cat & Polaris OEM Parts & Accessories – Cycle Parts Warehouse This wouldn't be a deal breaker if the machine is clean,but as with all used machines expect the unexpected.
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Old 02-09-2014, 06:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by old polaris tech View Post
Common problem on 2001 and 2002 models on creeping problems.I had more problems on these two year models than any other.This is mainly because the rear clutch gets out of alignment from the front clutch causing the belt to rub the inner front sheath keeping constant pressure on the rear clutch,making it hard to shift. Usually adding washers building out the rear clutch solves most of the problem. Most of the time I had to change belts as they were pretty glazed from the creeping and clutch slipping. Plus once you have the clutch cover off it's a good idea to blow out all the belt dust in an open area. Washer #2 behind the rear(driven) clutch is what I stocked up on.Dirt Cheap Yamaha, Honda, Arctic Cat & Polaris OEM Parts & Accessories – Cycle Parts Warehouse You can just slide the clutch off and match this washer at any hardware store. It's not that hard of a job.At times the front clutch fiber washer and brass washer in the one way bearing wear down allowing the belt to slide also.If this happens best to have a shop do it as the cost of the clutch puller and spider tool needed to separate the clutch would cost as much as the average shop charges to rebuild one. #2 and 18 on the washers.Dirt Cheap Yamaha, Honda, Arctic Cat & Polaris OEM Parts & Accessories – Cycle Parts Warehouse This wouldn't be a deal breaker if the machine is clean,but as with all used machines expect the unexpected.
Thank you for the input!

I am very mechanical, but short on time (and my barn is very big & very old...and very hard to heat). That being said, how much would you estimate I would have to pay to have this done at Polaris? I would likely have them go through the carb as well. I'm just trying to see if this is a $500 job or a $700-$800+ job. With the machine being worth $1,200-$1,300 I want to watch how much I spend. This is the first time this machine has had any of these issues. A solid 10 years with nothing but a couple belt changes, batteries, oil, filters....

I hope this thing won't be a money pit....lol
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Old 02-09-2014, 07:08 PM
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It's just a couple bucks on the fix if it's just shimming out the rear clutch,plus the price of a new belt if needed. All dealers are different. Some will treat you right, others may try to pad the bill,others may not know what they're doing. Not that hard to pop the clutch cover have it in neutral and see if the belt is riding the inside of the front sheath. A few shims and blowing out the clutches may solve the problem and save you some $.
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Old 02-09-2014, 07:15 PM
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Cool, so I will get it to my house and tear into it.

These shim washers don't need to be any sort of special material (brass/bronze/SS...etc)?

And just to clarify, this is the rear (driven) clutch only correct?
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Old 02-09-2014, 07:37 PM
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Just thin steel washers you can match up. Yes it's the rear clutch that's adjusted. Just take the 1/2" mounting bolt out and slide off the clutch. You'll find the washer and the big spacer(that you leave in place). Just get 3 or 4 extra washers. Be sure to look at the ribbed bearing in the front clutch and see if it has a lot of side to side play(the fiber and brass washer I mentioned) Normal clearance with a feeler gauge between the one way bearing and inner sheath is between .025 -.035 clearance. Any more and the front clutch may need to be serviced. The main thing you're trying to accomplish is to have the belt ride in the center of the front clutch without the belt touching the clutch sheaths. The rear clutch then should not be turning or just slightly trying to turn. Shifting gears should be easy after that. Plus don't forget to look at the sides of the belt for any glazed,burnt spots. If you find any replace the belt as it can still cause some creeping if you don't.
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Old 02-10-2014, 05:30 AM
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10-4, thank you for the info!

I'll be sure to update the thread once I get things apart.
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Old 03-18-2017, 08:20 PM
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Hey everybody. I'm back again, same machine. I just finished going through it completely (maintenance wise). All fluids done, all new filters/breather, all fittings greased.

In addition, I got a brand new LT3000 Superwinch for free!! A friend of a friend bought it a little over a year ago, pulled a bonehead move and stripped the positive post on the winch. He stuffed it back in the box and never looked at it again. He offered it to anyone who wanted it, I grabbed it! I pulled the motor apart, soldered in a brand new custom made post, good as new!

Onto my issue...
The machine has developed an exhaust leak at the front donut. I bought a new donut gasket, new manifold gasket, and new exhaust springs. I pulled the muffler off and checked it internally for restriction (best I could). Everything looks good, but I cannot get the leak to seal up. While it is at idle I can hear and feel it leaking at the front donut. If I push firmly on the exhaust pipe it does get quiet, but gets noisy as soon as I let go. Both halves of the joint are in great shape, nice and round with no cracks or debris. I'm going to try some Permatex exhaust sealant tomorrow, I hope it works!

If anyone has any input on what this might be, and a solution, it'd be much appreciated!!
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Old 03-19-2017, 07:55 AM
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The bell shaped end on the exhaust pipe wears out first.Even with a new exhaust donut and springs they can still seep. You can try the sealant and see if it helps.If it doesn't you can do as some have and used safety wire to snug the pipe in tighter than what the springs can. Pipe isn't cheap,but if you can't seal it completely might be time to consider a new one while they're still available. Item#14.
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Old 03-19-2017, 10:30 AM
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Thanks for the info!!

I'm headed out to get the sealant now. Here's to hoping I don't need to drop $130 on a pipe!
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