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In the market for a trailer

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  #11  
Old 02-14-2008, 02:30 AM
Range Rover
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Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 159
Default In the market for a trailer

One more question, just beacuse I dont know....

I pull my buddys 20' wellcraft from time to time so I don't have to pay for gas or bait, and his trailer has one of those brake setups that when the truck slows down the tounges movement foward applies a brake, (hydraulic). I am not worried about my truck stopping a trailer without brakes, just want to know if only boat trailers are like this. The worst part about it is that you have to get out and turn it off to do any backing.

Thanks.
 
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  #12  
Old 02-14-2008, 08:21 AM
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Join Date: Mar 2004
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Default In the market for a trailer

electric brakes would short out in the water ... thats why you only see them on boat trailers.
 
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  #13  
Old 02-14-2008, 10:42 AM
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Default In the market for a trailer

Boat trailers often have what are called hydraulic surge brakes. The actuator is often built into the tongue of the trailer, and applies trailer brakes when the trailer starts pushing on the tow vehicle's hitch system.

Electric drums don't care to be dunked in water, especially salt water.

Hydraulic surge brakes are also sometimes seen in renal trailers, because the tow vehicle would only need to be wired for trailer lights, and doesn't need the 6 or 7 pin connector for electric brakes, or need an electric brake controller.

Disadvantage is that the driver can't actuate the trailer brake independently, which is sometimes handy to get a big bumper pull trailer to quit swaying after a gust of side wind.

Also, as you pointed out, you have to go back and disable the brakes in order to back up.

There are also electric over hydraulic brake systems, which use a brake controller in the cab, but the trailer has an electrically operated pump that provides braking pressure to calipers and disk brakes.
 
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  #14  
Old 02-14-2008, 09:47 PM
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Default In the market for a trailer

The problem with trailers is that you can never get too big.. You end up with a larger trailer than you need. I started out with a double snowmobile trailer. I got an all aluminum one. Lighter weight = easier to pull. You have to watch capacity. Full size Utes will weigh somewhere around 600 lbs each. So two of them will be 1200 lbs right away. Add a tool box weighing 300#, anda dirt bike or two... You are now pushing 2000 lbs. OK, you may be able to get a single axle with that capacity, but you will need ot look hard for one. Aluminum doesn't rust either. Steel does. Most will have wooden decks. They last 10 years or so. Youcan have them line-x'd, but that can get pricey.
I have two trailers right now. I still have the snowmobile trailer for short hauls.. and check out my personal page for my enclosed one. It is a monster to tow. Right now, I am in the market for a new trailer again. This time, I am getting a 16 ft Triton alluminum one. Tandem axle, over 3400 carrying capacity, and I can load up 4 full sized with capacity to spare.
Also keep in mind that you have to stop all that weight. So I fele brakes are a necessity. Electric are my preference.. although some like surge brakes. I don't. Hooking them up is easy. They have kits now for most trucks that you just plug them in under the dash and go. No fuss, no muss. Any competent trailer place can hook you up. And NO, I have never had any problems with shorting out.. as someone else has suggested.

The best advice I can give you is do not cheap out. Your machines are a large investment.. do you trust your 15000 worth of TOYS to a 500 homebuilt or Home depot special?
 
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  #15  
Old 02-14-2008, 11:03 PM
Range Rover
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Default In the market for a trailer

Thanks 500HO and Jeffin, Now that makes sense about no electric brakes in water! Never thought of that. Again, thanks to everyone who has given me info. I have to run it by my accountant, (girlfriend), but I would like to put our presidents stimulis check to good use and pick up a trailer when it comes around!

Thanks again!
 
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  #16  
Old 02-15-2008, 04:19 PM
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Default In the market for a trailer

Let me preface that brake issue... I do not dunk my trailer into water like you would a boat trailer. If this is to be used as a trailer for ATV's I doubt you will be submerging the wheels.. hence, I have not had any issues when they are used as intended. You start submerging them and OK, I'll go along with that shorting comment. Like Jeffin has siad above, there are other issues with Surge brakes that make me want to stay away from them. The nice thing, and biggest painon electric is you can adjust them to teh weight you are carrying with your controller. It really comes in handy when switching from loaded to empty. or vice versa. I do not recommend any trailer without brakes however. They can push you around with all that weight. I have also used my trailer brakes to straighten a trailer out that is bucking in the wind. Pay close attention to weight distribution, and tonge height too. The tongue should be level or slightly down, and you need a good percentage of weight on the tongue. Too light and it will drive you, not the other way around. Lastly nomatter if you buy new, or used, re-pack the cheel bearings. Even if it is brand spanking new. Do it. And make darn sure you get the bearing cups that you can just pump the grease right in without taking it all apart. You will have ot look hard NOT to find them on most new trailers today.. but there are a few out there.
 
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  #17  
Old 02-15-2008, 05:33 PM
Range Rover
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Join Date: Dec 2006
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Default In the market for a trailer

Yeah, I'm definetly going to go electric, just wanted to know the difference. About the tounge levelness, are smaller trailers built with different heights? My uncle made my hitch, and my truck sits a little higher than stock, He made it with a 2" drop. Will I have to test them out to fit my hitch and be level, or would it just be easier to get a trailer I like, and have another hitch made to level the trailer? And also, the rear suspension is very stiff, if anyone has had a truck like mine! I dont think one quad on the fromt of the trailer is going to make it squat at all. Actually I think I answered my own question, and just have my uncle weld me one after I get a trailer!
 
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  #18  
Old 02-15-2008, 07:01 PM
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Default In the market for a trailer

As far as levelness goes, a couple inches out won't hurt anything, but beyond that and I'd be looking at getting the right ball mount to get it to ride correctly.

On your 3/4 ton, the weight of a quad trailer won't squat the suspension significantly.

I should also point out that not all electric brake controllers are created equal. The timer based ones are really a pain in the rear, getting their only input from the brake light switch. They apply the same trailer braking (unless manually adjusted) whether you are easing up to a stop sign in town, or slamming on the brakes in a panic stop at freeway speeds.

Inertia based controllers use either a pendilum or electronic accelerometer to detect tow vehicle deceleration and apply trailer brakes in proportion. They are a big step up from timer units, but can sometimes react a bump in the road while braking with a jolt of juice to the trailer brakes. They generally apply an initial current to the trailer upon activation of the brake lights, then ramp up from there depending on the deceleration detected. Technocia Prodegy is probably one of the best of this type.

A third kind, smoother yet, reads the application of tow vehicle brakes directly and applies trailer brakes in linear proportion. Brakesmart and Maxbrake use a solid state pressure transducer to measure brake fluid pressure. Jordan Ultima uses a linkage to measure brake pedal movement. Older brake controllers that were activated by fluid pressure were not compatable with proportioning valves, and anti-lock brakes because they displaced fluid to work, but the Brakesmart's electronic pressure sensor doesn't displace fluid, and thus doesn't effect anti-lock or proportioning systems. The drawbacks to the brakesmart would be that they are extremely expensive, and installing the sensor adds like 20 minutes to the installation.
 
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  #19  
Old 02-15-2008, 10:21 PM
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Default In the market for a trailer

HUh, I learn something every day. Thanks for sharing the technical stuff... All I know is I have to dial my controller down when I am empty, and then dial it up when I have a load. I test it a couple times just to make sure it is only assisting and not stopping the entire weight.. and I am good to go. If you look at my trailer in my personal page, I can tell you that I had my hands full with it when I picked it up at the factory. I had the laod equalizer hitch height it set perfect when I got there, and they Adjusted it up by a couple inches. Plus they didn't air the tires up properly. I drove it from Georgia to Northern Virginia with it like that, and it was a white knuckle affair. I was all over the place. When I got home, I set teh hitch down again, and aired the tires to teh proper pressure and can tell you it is a world of difference. My trailer is 11 ft tall, and it is very sensative to wind input. On that day, we were running along with a nasty low pressure cell on teh East Coast that was Just under hurricane strength.. and I am sure that may have had something to do with it too...
 
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  #20  
Old 02-16-2008, 07:23 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: cedar rapids ia
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Default In the market for a trailer

Name:  NEWQUADPICS001.jpg
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my latest project...
this is my new camper toy hauler it holds 2 quads easy sleeps 3 and has everything i need including thumpin tunes ad ps2

http://i192.photobucket.com/al...y/CAMPERINSIDE002.jpg

http://i192.photobucket.com/al...ey/CAMPERINSIDE003.jpg

the best thing i only paid 150.00 for the trailer but it needed a total restoration a few hunded hours and about 500 bucks and its ready to rip
 
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